Do You Have To Pay For Well Water?

Do You Have To Pay For Well Water
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In this article, we will be discussing the topic “Do you have to pay for well water?” If you’re buying a home that has a well, you need to have it inspected by a qualified company as part of your due diligence process.

Is this true? Homeowners need to be prepared to replace the good pump, pressure tank, and filters over time since there are no monthly water bills.

If you’re buying a home that has a well you must have it inspected by a qualified company as part of your due diligence process.

Different areas of the country have different fee structures, but here in the Raleigh- Durham-Chapel Hill area of North Carolina, a typical well inspection will cost somewhere between $150 – $250.

The well will be opened up, to determine the static level of the water inside. Samples of the water will be taken and sent to a laboratory to be tested for a variety of heavy metals and coliform bacteria.

The inspector should pull a copy of the original well permit which will indicate the GPM (Gallon per Minute) flow rate as well as the good depth.

Often there will be an aluminum band on the good casing with this information on it as well. It’s important to understand that the GPM of a well can change over time and could increase or decrease.

So if this is important to you as a buyer then you may want to have your inspector pump the well dry and confirm the current GPM flow rate.

The inspector should also inspect your pressure tank which is located in or under the house. This is what creates water pressure inside your home.

Water quality can vary dramatically and there may be one or more types of filters that will also need to be inspected including a water softener if you live in an area with hard water.

While there are no monthly water bills, homeowners need to be prepared to replace the good pump, the pressure tank, and filters (if any) over time.

In addition, a well can go dry in which case homeowners will be faced with either having to have their well fracked to see if they can’t get it flowing again.

This was the original fracking and while similar in concept is not the same fracking done for gas drilling or they may need to have a new well drilled. These expenses could easily exceed several years of water bills.

Keep reading this article to know more about the topic of do you have to pay for well water?

 

Homes With Well Water

 

When a home is supplied with well water, it means that they get their drinking, bathing, and cleaning water from the private well on their property. But most people still find the need to ask the question “Do you need to pay for well water.

Yes, you do need to pay for well water but that is for the installation of the well. Wells are built by drilling into the ground and accessing an underground aquifer.

That water is then pumped into the house. A house with a well can either be connected to the city’s sewer system or use a septic system.

No, you do not pay a water bill.. you may pay a sewage bill if your house is hooked up to a municipal water system some areas of MI have wells and municipal water systems so.

This said it’s generally much cheaper to have a water well and onsite septic system than to pay for municipal water and sewage.

 

For this, do you have to pay for well water?

 

While there are no monthly water bills, homeowners need to be prepared to replace the good pump, the pressure tank, and filters (if any) over time. These expenses could easily exceed several years of water bills.

Additionally, how much does it cost to go from well water to city water?

According to, a might charge between $291 to $386 for this job, but it could be a lot more than this. It will depend on many factors, including the distance from the city water line to your water pump.

Also, something to know is, how much does it cost to put in a well and septic?

 

Cost To Put In Well and Septic System

 

A septic system costs $3,280 to $5,040 to install by itself on average. The cost to put in a well and septic system ranges from $6,000 to $20,000 depending on the type of septic system, type of absorption field, size of the septic tank, and depth of good drilling required. No, you do not pay a water bill.

You may pay a sewage bill if your house is hooked up to a municipal water system (some areas of MI have wells and municipal water systems so).

Plus you will have to pay to operate, and maintain, your water well and water system this will include electricity, salt, and chemicals (if you have a water treatment/conditioning system), filters, etc.

Additionally, if you have a septic system you should pay to have the septic system pumped out occasionally (how frequently depends upon its design and the load you put on it e.g. how many residents use it) because of the solids in your sewage can clog it.

This said it’s generally much cheaper to have a water well and onsite septic system than to pay for municipal water and sewage.

 

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Major Advantages Of Well Water

 

You won’t get a water bill. If your water is coming from your private well, then you won’t get a monthly water bill. If you are using a septic system, you won’t be getting a monthly sewer use bill.

Having fewer bills is normally a good thing.

Well, water is normally fresher, high in nutrients, and high in minerals. Because well water is coming from the aquifer underground, instead of run-off or surface water, it tends to be cleaner and fresher.

Groundwater is also high in healthy nutrients and minerals that are good for the body, including children. Also, well water high in minerals often tastes better.

Well, water is usually protected from contamination during a natural disaster. Natural disasters, like floods, tend to disrupt a city’s ability to distribute healthy water to homes.

Wells are typically immune from this problem unless the disaster is particularly bad and widespread.

 

Major Disadvantages of Well Water

 

Finally in this article on “Do you need to pay for well water” let’s look into some of the major disadvantages of well water.

Well, water is dependent on electricity. Well, water needs to be pumped out of the ground. If the electricity goes out, then your Well water is normally fresher, high in nutrients, and high in minerals.

Because well water is coming from the aquifer underground, instead of run-off or surface water, it tends to be cleaner and fresher.

Groundwater is also high in healthy nutrients and minerals that are good for the body, including children. Also, well water high in minerals often tastes better.

Well, water is usually protected from contamination during a natural disaster. Natural disasters, like floods, tend to disrupt a city’s ability to distribute healthy water to homes.

Wells are typical pumps and will stop working. If your pump stops working no water. You will want to make sure that you have an alternative source of electricity (generator, solar), or be prepared to go without water if the electricity goes out.

You are responsible for the quality and quantity of your water. If your well runs dry it isn’t the city’s problem. Because the well is on your property, you are responsible for any maintenance, repairs, or additional drilling needed.

Depending on the repair, it can be quite expensive. You are also responsible for the quality of your well water. It is up to you to have your water regularly tested to verify that it is safe to use.

Well, water can become contaminated. Chemicals, radiation, sewage, and dead animals are all potential pollutants that can contaminate well water.

Runoff from farms, septic systems, nuclear power plants and a dead animal falling into your water source can all impact the quality of the water in your well. Check out these statistics from the EP.

The primary sources of nutrient pollution are fertilizer, animal manure, sewage treatment plant discharge, detergents, storm-water runoff, cars and power plants, failing septic tanks, and pet waste.

15,000 Estimated number of water bodies in the United States impaired by nutrients 101,000 Miles of rivers and streams impaired by nutrients in the United States, 3,500,000 Acres of lakes and reservoirs impaired by nutrients in the United States.

20% Percentage of shallow household wells in agricultural areas with nitrate levels above drinking water standards. More than 90% of people living in Mississippi get their drinking water from groundwater

It is clear if you have well water it needs to be tested regularly. Making sure the water is free from pollutants like chemicals, heavy metals, bacteria, and parasites is your responsibility and you should take it seriously.

The good news is, with regular testing, and/or a whole house water filter, you can rest easy that your water is fresh and healthy.

However, having a well and septic tank on site is usually much cheaper than paying for municipal water and wastewater.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Do you need to pay for well water? For houses that possess a well as their primary source of water, you don’t have to pay for well water. You can pay your sewer bill if your home is connected to a municipal water system.

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